Past Meets Present

Start with a clever idea, execute it with skill and creativity, and you can produce something that is really great fun. The folks at Nerd Fest UK did just that with the video mashup we have for Music Monday. One of the most commercially successful music singles released last year was a song called “Uptown Funk” by British music producer Mark Ronson and American singer/performer Bruno Mars. An infectiously catchy and danceable track, “Uptown Funk” was also critically acclaimed for its fun-loving “throwback” quality. For many – especially those of us who are a lot older than the millenials! – it was reminiscent of old-school funk and early Prince recordings. Bruno Mars is one of the truly talented performers among the current crop of pop artists. He’s been praised for his extraordinary vocal ability and “retro” style of showmanship.

So in this video, the Nerd Fest people paired “Uptown Funk” with dancing clips from movie musicals of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly figure prominently of course, but there’s also Judy Garland, James Cagney, Ann Miller, the Nicholas Brothers, Rita Hayworth, Frank Sinatra, Shirley Temple and a host of others. If you grew up watching those films like I did, you will delight in this video. The editing is mind-blowlingly perfect. The creators have stated that they neither sped up nor slowed down any of the clips, so the synchronizing is genuine and spot on. It’s a real trip to see old Hollywood legends hoofing it to a contemporary song from 2014. The Bruno Mars/Mark Ronson video can be viewed at this link.

Just some of my favorite details: Ginger’s dress at 2:10, Astaire stepping toward his cane at 3:28, Eleanor Powell’s mosh pit at 4:22, and the Berry Brothers do a leap off a balcony into splits, at 4:30, that is one of the most insane things I’ve ever seen. If I did that my leg would be broken in three places! Here’s the mashup. Fabulously well done … enjoy! :-)

Mom at 80

Eighty years ago today, a baby girl was born in upper Manhattan to two Armenian immigrants. It was their first child in their adopted country, and they named her Elaine. She is my Mommy :-)

You don’t get to 80 years of age without experiencing your share of triumphs and hardships, joys and travails, and forging rich meaningful relationships. Mom is beloved and adored by her family and friends, as she should be. It is rare to know a person of such warmth, kindness, generosity, and loyalty. And to have her as your mother is a blessing beyond words.

Since Mom’s birthday falls on a Monday this year, our Music Monday post is all hers. I chose a song that reflects Mom’s eternally hopeful spirit, her persistent wish for the happiness and well-being of her family, her friends, and her community. Mom doesn’t give up. Never has, and never will. And there’s no better person to sing this song than one of Mom’s idols, the one and only Elvis Presley. Though he is frozen in the minds of many as the hip-shaking rock-and-roller on the Ed Sullivan Show, many people forget what a truly expressive vocalist he was. He could bring the goosebumps with the best of them. A magnificently powerful performer. For you Mom … Happy birthday. Love you :-)

Nothing to Fear But Fear Itself

Hellooooo friends! I hope everyone is well. I’d like to take a little break from art and music for this post, because the animal lover in me can’t resist sharing this video. It’s been viewed 18 million times on YouTube, and it’s adorably funny. I guess I’m one of those rare people who is neither a “dog person” or a “cat person”. I love them both. But it’s the cats who are striking fear into these lovable dogs. I was dying at 1:04 :lol:

We have lots of good stuff on deck for Museworthy. Art modeling has resumed so there will be dispatches from the studios, new profiles of muses, more art talk, music exploration, and a blog anniversary coming up next week. So stay tuned! See you soon :-)

Flight to Freedom

For this 4th of July holiday weekend, my love of animals and love of my country come together in a blog post. If the bald eagle – symbol of America and its freedoms – can be rehabilitated from injury and trauma, then surely America herself can do the same. Let’s hope so. Let’s hope that we too can soar again. Have a wonderful Independence Day weekend, everyone. See you soon. Blessings .. :-)

A Toast to Verdi

The classical music “flash mob” fad has really grown on me. You can find videos all over YouTube of cheerful cellists, violinists and the like bursting into performance in public places to the delight of commuters and pedestrians. The scenes can truly lift your spirits.

I came across this video that I thought would make a charming Music Monday. Canadian opera singer Jonathan Estabrooks organized and directed this “flash mob” at an upscale New York City event. During the cocktail hour, unsuspecting guests were treated to a spontaneous performance of the merry “Drinking Song” from Verdi’s La Traviata by incognito opera singers who had been blending in with the crowd. Good fun. Raise a glass and enjoy!


A splendid portrait of Giuseppe Verdi by Giovanni Boldini. Verdi sat for this piece reluctantly, but both artist and sitter were quite pleased with the results. Pastel on cardboard, 1886:


Hearing the Heart

What happens when doctors and musicologists join forces and embark on a research project? Some interesting, albeit speculative, theories are born. A couple of weeks ago, a article on the Internet grabbed my attention and, for a brief moment, set my heart aflutter <– I’m cute and clever for choosing that phrase as you will soon see. A medical journal published the article in which is it theorized that the distinctly dramatic, sometimes volatile and erratic tempos found in Beethoven’s music were caused by the composer having had a cardiac arrhythmia. My own damaged aortic valve and I became excited at the thought that the great Beethoven was a fellow member of the heart abnormalities club. It’s all I’d ever have in common with my musical hero that’s for sure. I’ll never compose brilliant music and I’ll never be German :P

But alas, none of it amounted to some newly discovered provable truth about Beethoven. As the cardiologist involved with the paper said himself, “This is entirely speculative”. Well, phooey then.

Anatomical drawing of the heart by Leonardo da Vinci:


Putting aside my childish desire to have heart issues in common with the greatest composer who ever lived (yes I’m weird), the study raises some compelling questions about the intersection of creativity and science, or artistic abilities and human biology if you will. I have nothing against scientific research and new ideas, conjectural though they often are. Much of it is quite fascinating. On the other hand, the tendency to pathologize the reasons behind artistic expression is as disillusioning as it is intriguing. It falls into the category of things that are over-analyzed to death, investigated and studied and pulled apart to no real illuminating end or purpose. And that indescribable realm in which artistic gifts take flight is a realm that science can never explain or elucidate no matter how hard it may try.

We know that Beethoven was deaf, and hardly the only deaf person who ever lived. We also know he suffered from lead poising, which was not uncommon in Beethoven’s era. And yet Beethoven was the only lead-poisoned deaf person to compose the 5th Symphony. Physical ailments, of which Beethoven had many, don’t define us exclusively. Isn’t it just possible that Beethoven’s soaring melodies, fierce tempo shifts, and complex harmonies were the result of him being, well, a musical genius? Isn’t it possible his music is “heartfelt” not due to “atrial tachycardia” but to the man’s profoundly intimate understanding of the human soul? To attribute the emotional weightiness of Beethoven’s String Quartets to a bout of “angina” strikes me as a bit unseemly.

I will, however, point out what I think is the most convincing postulation of the study. The researchers claim that because Beethoven was deaf he would have been more aware of his heartbeat. That is genuinely interesting and makes you think. Unlike the 188 years-late diagnosis of an irregular heartbeat, Beethoven’s deafness was real and without question impacted the nature of his composing as it progressed throughout his life; middle register and lower frequency notes are more perceivable in the inner ear before complete deafness sets in. High notes go first, and Beethoven began to complain about that as early as age 30.

Beethoven’s hearing aids, known as “ear trumpets”:


Oddities, illnesses, and abnormalities may or may not affect creativity. I posted previously about the alleged shrapnel lodged in the brain of Shostakovich. But the art and music survive, and how lucky we are for that. Let’s conclude this Music Monday with a video of Beethoven’s hand-written music manuscripts. They’re incredible to see, smudges, smears, erasures and all. His heart is clearly beating throughout:

The Light Shines

The past couple of days; last minute shopping, wrapping paper sorting, candle-lighting, purchasing wine and cookies, praying, donating to charities, praying some more, and tending the children at church for the Christmas pageant tonight, reminding them of their cues and practicing their songs – it went beautifully by the way. Tomorrow we gather at Mom’s house for Christmas Day in keeping with a Hajian family tradition. And Friday … Friday I can sleep! Is anyone else feeling spent?

Although it’s Wednesday night – Christmas Eve – we’ll turn this post into a “Music Monday” with the Grammy award winning Soweto Gospel Choir, performing “This Little Light of Mine”. Tremendous performers, rich inspirational voices. I wish for my readers all the joy, exultation, warmth and rebirth of the season. Blessings, always ..

“You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house”
Matthew 5:14-15