Tide and Tableau

So another school year has come to an end, and this thankful artist’s model can wind down from months and months of posing all around town. On this unseasonably hot May evening I raise a glass of cold beer to all the people I had the pleasure of modeling for and interacting with; the artists, the grad students and the undergrads, the class monitors, the instructors and model bookers and maintenance workers, the cherished old acquaintances and the lovely new ones, and especially to this big, crowded, noisy city, which generously provides ample work for us art models like no other city can. It’s amazing. So here’s to you New York. Cheers! :takes a long refreshing gulp of Stella Artois:

Ah, but my wind down won’t last too long. Summer sessions will begin soon and I am, again, thankful to already have bookings in my calendar for June, July, and August. Summer, even with a decent amount of art modeling work, has a different tempo, as it should. Freelance work ebbs and flows like a tide. Learn how to float on the currents and you’ll be just fine. But creating art takes no real “hiatus” if you think about it. Heck I have three gigs next week. Wait … what? I thought this was my vacation! 😆

Here is some of my recent modeling for you, darling readers. My one and two minute quick poses, sketched by my fabulous dear friend Jordan Mejias. A model’s gesture set collected on a single page makes for a wonderful composition in itself. From Minerva’s Drawing Studio  last Monday night.

Ignacio Pinazo Camarlench

I posted a figure painting to my Tumblr a couple of weeks ago that has received over 200 likes and reblogs. And we all know that accumulating “likes” on social media is the most sought-after form of validation in our culture, right? Do we even matter if we’re not getting “likes”? How are we to measure our popularity and worth if not by “likes”?? 😛 I’m kidding of course, but there was an eye-catching Impressionistic quality to the painting that appealed to many of my fellow Tumblrers.

By the way, does everyone know that I have a Tumblr? In case you don’t, it’s called meanderings and it’s a collection of images that I find interesting, fun, or intriguing. No commentary like here on Museworthy, just a potpourri of cool stuff. Art, photography, animals, etc. Feel free to check it out and assess my curatorial skills.

So the painting I posted was this nude by the 19th century Spanish artist Ignacio Pinazo Camarlench. In addition to the lovely swimming figure, the teal color is great.

Camarlench was born in Valencia in 1849. He grew up poor and worked in various jobs to help support the family. By the time he was 21 he was enrolled in art academies and on his way to a successful career as a painter, doing commissions, receiving awards, and teaching.

I looked at a lot of his work, and I especially like when he worked in a more painterly style with conspicuous brushstrokes. But he really mixed it up over the course of his life, shifting gears in both style and palette. His subjects range from portraits to landscapes to nudes, and many works of his children. I’ve selected a few to share here with my readers.

Clavariesas:

Nude:

Lovers:

The Procession in Godella:

Icarios’ Games:

Marisa, the artist’s granddaughter:

Mounted Guards:

Nude

And the man himself in a really cool self-portrait from 1895. I dig the hat 🙂

For more Camarlench, including some drawings, go to Museo del Prado.

Blog Buzz

Hellooooo friends! We’re just a little over a week away from the Museworthy “Portraits and Pets” Art Show. To those of you who submitted a work, thank you! And if anyone hasn’t submitted but would still like to, you’re welcome to do so. Still a few days left!

I’d also like to pass along an article from Vanity Fair about the current turmoil going on at New York City’s beloved Metropolitan Museum. Art lovers and museum-goers who haven’t heard about this fiasco might be interested. I always thought that the Met’s scheme to ‘re-brand’ and invest heavily in more modern and contemporary art and multi-million dollar expansions could backfire, and now it appears that its really happening. In a nutshell, the museum’s director Thomas Campbell has just resigned, and a so-called “gift” from businessman Leonard Lauder of a valuable Cubist artwork collection – and the construction of a new wing in which to house it – has become less a gift and more a financial albatross. Layoffs, huge budget deficit … it’s all a dismal story of managerial incompetence and the cluelessness of uber wealthy board-of-trustee types.

But this art institution – ‘this’ being the Museworthy blog – can happily report no behind the scenes upheaval! I suppose having only one ‘curator’, no billions of dollars at stake, and no real state on Fifth Avenue might make things easier. Just a little 😆 Which brings me to expressing my thanks to art student Yanjun for letting me post her drawing of me on the blog. This is my pose from Robert Armetta’s ‘Structural Drawing’ class at the New York Academy of Art. For long sitting poses, models can still position themselves in a way with subtle shifts, creating nuanced movement and shapes:

I’ll see you all back here on Tuesday, April 4th for the Museworthy Art Show! Between now and then, I’ll be modeling around town for another busy week of work. I hope you’re all doing well and finding rewards, joys, connections, and inspirations every day.

Life in Detail

Friday morning. I walk down tree-lined blocks in my neighborhood toward the train station. Have to catch the 8:14 to Manhattan. Suddenly, from overhead, that distinct harsh screech of a red-tailed hawk; “keeeee-aarr!!”. I look up and there he is. Circling effortlessly above the Duane Reade and Queens rooftops. Good morning you beautiful wild raptor. Seeing me off to work, are you? 🙂

25 minutes later, Penn Station, morning rush hour. A woman begins to struggle getting her stroller with a toddler up the stairs to the C subway platform. I bend down and pick up the front. Together she and I make easy work carrying the stroller for the ascent. “Gracias”, she says to me. “Muchas gracias”.

Downtown, 15 minutes before drawing session starts. At the overpriced hipster coffee shop, a pleasant exchange with the barista about the deliciousness of almond milk. He tells me to “have a great day!”.

At Minerva’s studio, I’m introduced to a man from Naples. A math professor who enjoys drawing in his spare time. He pronounces my name “CLOU – dia”.

Morning session, long pose. Afternoon session, gestures and short poses. I’m the model for both. Bang my shin. Can’t find my favorite hair clip. Feeling flexible. And creative. Finished at 4:00. Man who had been drawing comes over to me, presses a $10 bill into my palm. “Oh gosh, thank you so much!” I say. “No, thank YOU” he replies. “Great poses”. A rare modeling tip.

C train back uptown. Muscly hardhat guy gives up his seat for an elderly lady. My Blackberry beeps out a text message; a modeling gig inquiry for January. Group of tourists consulting a NYC subway map.

Penn Station again. Rush hour again. Homeless trumpeter is playing a plaintive “Silent Night”. His horn reverberates throughout the Eight Avenue concourse. I drop some singles in his instrument case. He nods at me without moving the trumpet mouthpiece from his lips.

Back on the railroad, track 21, the 4:46 back to Queens. Seat at the window. Man, mid-thirties, dark complexion, sits next to me. Takes out a leather bound Bible. Reads Corinthians for the entire ride. I put in my iPod earbuds. Scroll for music. Schubert’s piano Impromptus. Sit back. Finish my box of raisins.

Home in Queens. Jessie the cat rubs lovingly against my legs. Purring … “rrrrrr”. The ball of fur missed me. Can of salmon for her. Glass of wine for me. Day of blessings. Day of grace. Day of reminders, reinforcements, interactions, and taking nothing for granted.

From that day, my one minute gesture poses sketched by Bob Palevitz … in detail:

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Sustaining Days

Modeling by me. Sketches, notes, and anatomy lesson by Minerva Durham. Wednesday afternoon, 293 Broome St, New York City:

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So what have you all been doing the past few days? 😉 Hopefully being sustained, as I have, by doing what rewards you, challenges you, nourishes you, and galvanizes you through the tedium. I am grateful for my livelihood an an artist’s model, and privileged to work with inspiring individuals like Minerva, the best life drawing instructor in New York City.

It’s a busy time of year. So when I’m not blogging, you know what I’m doing! Early wishes for a happy Thanksgiving to all. See you back here very soon … peace, friends.

The Naked Gunner

When I explore for blog post topics, it’s rare that the various themes that interest me converge all at once. So imagine my surprise when I came across an image that brought together 1) nudity and the human form, 2) photography, and 3) history; all of which are topics I gladly feature here on Museworthy from time to time when I veer away from art and art-related stuff. Today I’d like to share with my readers a photo I encountered on Rare Historical Photos. Now I should mention that I initially stopped to gaze upon this image for the simple reason that I’m a heterosexual woman and, well, I liked what I saw .. 😉 But I became even more enthralled with the image when I read the incredible backstory behind it – because a photo of a naked guy manning a machine gun in an amphibious aircraft has to have a great backstory.

The photo was taken by Horace Bristol, one of the founding photojournalists for LIFE magazine. His work documented historic chapters of the 20th century, such as migrant workers during the Great Depression and World War II combat in North Africa and the Pacific. The young U.S Navy crewman in the photo was part of a search and rescue mission in Rabaul Bay, Papua New Guinea in 1944. When a Marine airman was shot down by the Japanese and temporarily blinded, this young man stripped off his clothes for easier swimming, dove into the water and pulled the Marine to safety aboard the “Dumbo” PBY. Horace Bristol, who was aboard the aircraft during the rescue, recalled the conditions at that moment:

As soon as we could, we took off. We weren’t waiting around for anybody to put on formal clothes. We were being shot at and wanted to get the hell out of there. The naked man got back into his position at his gun in the blister of the plane.

Bristol then snapped a photo of the brave, still wet crewman as he readied for takeoff, carrying on with his duties in the nude, because urgency and safety come before all else. And because clothes are not essential <– as an art model I can say that.

naked-gunner

The crewman is unidentified, though perhaps Horace Bristol knew his name at the time and did not make it public. One can’t help but wonder about this man. Did he live through the war and make it home alive? Did he know that Bristol took a photo of him naked? What part of the United States was he from? Was he a awarded a medal for his heroism? Unanswered questions. But at least he is immortalized in this remarkable photo which reminds us of wartime bravery and the formidable courage of a generation of men.

Now if there are any World War II enthusiasts or military history enthusiasts among my readers, maybe one of you can help me out regarding this aircraft. The PBY is a “flying boat”, so I’m assuming it was something like the picture on this page? Really want to know what this intrepid crewman was operating on that harrowing day.

Happy 9th Birthday Museworthy!!

blog
noun
1. a regularly updated website or web page, typically one run by an individual or small group, that is written in an informal or conversational style.

How do you all feel about that definition? I think it’s a little “meh”, as the kids today would say. So as a blogger for nine years I believe I can expand – perhaps rewrite – that description just a bit. A “blog” is a corner of the internet where an individual can share and communicate their otherwise ignored voice, and be discovered by anyone who might seek out such a voice. A “blog” is an intimate platform where discussion, learning, documenting and diversion work joyfully hand in hand. A “blog” is a place where people from distant places around the globe can connect who would otherwise never have connected. I could go on, but I think you get the picture.

Fred Hatt, photographer extraordinaire and my beautiful, steadfast friend, deserves special commendation this year for calmly persevering through our photo session in which I was, admittedly, difficult. Not *acting like a diva bitch* difficult but *moody and sullen* difficult. Couldn’t find my mojo. Couldn’t clear my head of all my nagging emotional turmoil. But after a few hours (and a couple of glasses of wine) we managed to pull this shot out of many misfires. The body language speaks for itself. Thank you Fred, for your patience and kindness, as always ..

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Now, as I always do in these anniversary posts, I must express my deepest, humblest, sincerest thanks to all my readers; from the die-hard regulars (where would I be without you guys?) to the occasional drop-ins (always great to have you!) to the recent new subscribers (welcome!), ALL of you, thank you for your visits, your comments, your emails … thank you for finding points of interest in my chosen topics, my art modeling profession, my pictures, stories, and even my personal tribulations. Thank you for everything. I extend a heartfelt invitation to each of you to stick around for year ten 🙂

And now it’s song time! My fondness for late 60s blues-inspired British rock remains my default preference, so I’m going full on Jeff Beck Group this year. That’s the young Rod Stewart doing his trademark raunchy, raspy vocals. From Jeff Beck’s debut album Truth, released in 1968 – the year I was born – this is “Let Me Love You”. Enjoy! And again, thank you all …

Your muse,
Claudia
xo