Portraits & Pets – A Museworthy Art Show

Companions. Loved ones. Models. Friends. Souls – human and animal – with faces and gazes, personalities and body language, stories and histories. Followers of this blog contributed works of art – in a most glorious array of expressions – to a little online art show themed “Portraits and Pets”. Some included brief descriptions to accompany their work, others let their art stand alone. Each one is thoroughly unique, and a gesture of participation in this blog’s congenial community. And your blog hostess was honored to participate right along with you. I now present …”Portraits and Pets”! Enjoy 🙂

Ron Anticevich
Radar
oil on linen
Simi Valley, California

Mark Wummer
Finding Flint
watercolor
“Flint is a fifty-five pound black lab that started his life training to be a service dog but decided on a career change, and instead became our son’s family pet. He can curl himself into a ball of black fur so tightly that it’s tough to know what part of him you are looking at.”
Reading, Pennsylvania

Derek James Tewey
Mariama, my sister, 1935-2017
acrylic
“I miss her”
Brisbane, Australia

Dave Moran
Hero
graphite
“my pit bull mix”
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Fred Hatt
Leo and My Foot
Aquarelle crayon and gouache on grey paper
Brooklyn, New York

Todd Fife
Ilex
pencil, acrylic, coffee, gold leaf
Bowling Green, Kentucky

Daniel Maidman
Felix
oil on canvas
Brooklyn, New York

Bill MacDonald
Young Man with a Beard
colored pencil over graphite
Quincy, Massachusetts

Two from
Susan Berkowitz
King
gouache, watercolor, and acrylic on aquaboard
Brooklyn, New York

Susie
oil pastel

Rob Carroll
Lulu
HB pencil
Swindon, UK

Bruce Williams
Claudia and Ika
hand-colored drypoint
New York City

Two from
Judy Waller
Best of Friends
watercolor on paper
“At home in the studio where she lives and works, her little parrot Beatrix can almost always be seen sitting contentedly on Lita’s shoulder. Lita starts every day by holding Beatrix in her palm and stroking her feathers, much to the little bird’s obvious delight. They truly are ‘Best of Friends!'”
Roseburg, Oregon

Siesta
watercolor on paper
“My painting of Mike and his dog Sophie captures the tender affection between the two, in a peaceful moment of repose. Mike has a natural affinity for animals, and can befriend even the most reluctant dog or cat almost instantly.”

Elaine Hajian
Patriarch
pastel
“My grandfather who came to America to escape the Armenian Genocide. Honoring a gentle man who will live forever in our hearts.”
New York City

Mark Kurdziel
Blu
oil on linen
Jersey City, New Jersey

Christopher Hickey
Anne’s Black Bird
etching tinted with watercolor
“our cat Noelle has a cameo role”
Atlanta, Georgia

Francisco Malonzo
Connie 3
acrylic
New York City

Rosanne Kaloustian
Rose
pastel
“This painting of my aunt was created from an old black and white photo … remembering the good old days.”
New York City

Roberta Moring
Pauly
acrylic
“My muse is my beautiful African Ring-Neck parrot”
West Bend, Wisconsin

Claudia Hajian
Jessie and her Blue Toy
pastel on paper
New York City

Blog Buzz

Hellooooo friends! We’re just a little over a week away from the Museworthy “Portraits and Pets” Art Show. To those of you who submitted a work, thank you! And if anyone hasn’t submitted but would still like to, you’re welcome to do so. Still a few days left!

I’d also like to pass along an article from Vanity Fair about the current turmoil going on at New York City’s beloved Metropolitan Museum. Art lovers and museum-goers who haven’t heard about this fiasco might be interested. I always thought that the Met’s scheme to ‘re-brand’ and invest heavily in more modern and contemporary art and multi-million dollar expansions could backfire, and now it appears that its really happening. In a nutshell, the museum’s director Thomas Campbell has just resigned, and a so-called “gift” from businessman Leonard Lauder of a valuable Cubist artwork collection – and the construction of a new wing in which to house it – has become less a gift and more a financial albatross. Layoffs, huge budget deficit … it’s all a dismal story of managerial incompetence and the cluelessness of uber wealthy board-of-trustee types.

But this art institution – ‘this’ being the Museworthy blog – can happily report no behind the scenes upheaval! I suppose having only one ‘curator’, no billions of dollars at stake, and no real state on Fifth Avenue might make things easier. Just a little 😆 Which brings me to expressing my thanks to art student Yanjun for letting me post her drawing of me on the blog. This is my pose from Robert Armetta’s ‘Structural Drawing’ class at the New York Academy of Art. For long sitting poses, models can still position themselves in a way with subtle shifts, creating nuanced movement and shapes:

I’ll see you all back here on Tuesday, April 4th for the Museworthy Art Show! Between now and then, I’ll be modeling around town for another busy week of work. I hope you’re all doing well and finding rewards, joys, connections, and inspirations every day.

Joyful Happenings

Hi everyone! Just a couple of announcements for our Museworthy community. Spring will be arriving in a few weeks – YAY!! – and it’s the time of year that reinvigorates us, lifts us up and out and about, gifts us with buoyant spirits and pours a feeling of expansiveness into our souls. So first, I’ve finally set a date for the Museworthy “Portraits and Pets” art show. Because I’ll be quite busy with a full art modeling schedule in March, the show will go up on the blog on Tuesday, April 4th. For those of you who still plan to submit something, if you could get it to me by March 26th at the latest that would be great.

The artwork of longtime Museworthy reader and friend to this blog Todd Fife will be on exhibit at the Tim Faulkner Gallery in Louisville, Kentucky. His “Oculi” series of bold, compelling portrait pieces created with graphite, watercolor, acrylic, ink, pencil, and gold and silver leaf, presents to the viewers a collection of expressive gazes in the eyes of various models. I am honored to be one of those models 🙂 The opening reception is on Friday, March 3rd at 6 PM and the exhibit will remain on view through March 30. You can read the press release for Todd’s show at this link. Congratulations Todd!

Lastly, the 2017 Whitney Biennial will open on March 17. New Yorkers and tourists who may be visiting our fair city this spring might want to check it out. Notably, it will be the first Biennial to be held at the Whitney’s new home in lower Manhattan. I wrote two blog posts about the new Whitney that readers can revisit if they’re interested; “Glass, Granite, and Urban Awakenings” and “Resurrection at the Whitney”.

Thanks for reading and I’ll see you all soon, friends!

Brevity

Mirror Image

In my experiences modeling for figure drawing classes I’ve seen teachers instruct a class to try drawing with their non-dominant hands. Obviously the resulting drawings are not – nor are they intended to be – artistic masterpieces. It’s just an exercise. But the looks of puzzlement on the artists’ faces afterward is amusing to see. I can relate though, as I have not an ounce of ambidexterity in me. I’m right-handed and anything I write with my left hand is barely legible. I’m right-dominant even beyond writing. I balance better on my right leg than on my left. When performing workout exercises, such as lunges and reverse lunges, side planks, etc, I feel more stable doing them on my right side than on my left. I can’t hammer a nail in the wall with my left hand, can’t throw a frisbee with my left hand. The list goes on.

They say that a mere 1% of people are fully and naturally ambidextrous. That’s quite an exclusive club! It’s all about our brain hemispheres and the degree of symmetry between the right and left sides of the brain. Michelangelo was ambidextrous, as was Benjamin Franklin, Nikola Tesla, and Albert Einstein. NBA superstar LeBron James is ambidextrous, along with some other famous athletes who display ambidexterity in their respective sports, such as tennis player Maria Sharapova and soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo.

Perhaps the most famous ambidextrous figure in history is the original “Renaissance Man”; the one and only Leonardo da Vinci. And as if his genius and ambidexterity weren’t impressive enough, da Vinci took it a step further. He was adept at the skill of “mirror writing”. Mirror writing is writing that is backwards – from right to left – and can’t easily be read on the page, but appears normal when reflected in a mirror. I remember, as a young child, not understanding why the word “AMBULANCE” was written backwards on the front of the emergency vehicle. My dad explained to me that it was so the word could be read in the rear view mirrors of drivers on the road. That’s an example of mirror writing in the world around us.

In this page from his notebooks exploring the anatomy of the arm, Da Vinci’s notes are done in mirror writing:

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So the question is, why did da Vinci do mirror writing? The answer is we don’t know for sure. It remains a mystery although speculations have been offered. One theory is that he wanted to retain some degree of secrecy with regard to his studies and discoveries. Let’s say some idiot troublemaker broke into Leonardo’s studio and stole his notebooks. He’d later look through them, thinking he got his hands on the genius’s precious work, and ask, “What the hell is this? Dammit!”. Another theory is that the mirror writing provided better neatness. da Vinci painted with both his left and right hands, but he wrote with his left hand, and as you southpaws out there can attest, smudges and smears can be a nuisance when writing right-to-left. Yet another theory – my favorite – is that da Vinci simply enjoyed mirror writing and found that it fueled his creativity and intellect. He’s Leonardo da Vinci, after all, so why the hell not? 🙂

You’ve all seen this iconic study of human proportions. It’s da Vinci’s “Vitruvian Man”, c. 1490, again with notes written in mirror writing:

Vitruvian Man c. 1492.

So because I felt inspired by a brilliant polymath like Leonardo da Vinci, I decided to do my own mirror writing. I did it with my right hand … and it still sucks! Thought I was running out of space and got jammed. I took a picture of it in reflection. For what it’s worth, I actually have pretty nice handwriting when it’s done normally. Now if only I can come up with some engineering inventions, timeless portraiture, and detailed anatomical studies, then I’ll be on my way to greatness. Watch out, Leo! 😆

photo-on-2-8-17-at-11-42-pm

Love Divine

Love came down at Christmas,
Love all lovely, Love Divine
Love was born at Christmas,
Star and angels gave the sign.

— Christina Rossetti

Salvador Dali, Maria conferens in corde suo, watercolor and gouache, 1964:

http://art-dali.com

A merry Museworthy Christmas to all, and Happy Hanukkah, Happy Solstice, and blessings of all kinds to all people. Sing a song of joy, and remember that a light glows for you, illuminating the darkness, guiding you toward grace and truth . . .

Peace, friends.

Claudia
xoxo

Life in Detail

Friday morning. I walk down tree-lined blocks in my neighborhood toward the train station. Have to catch the 8:14 to Manhattan. Suddenly, from overhead, that distinct harsh screech of a red-tailed hawk; “keeeee-aarr!!”. I look up and there he is. Circling effortlessly above the Duane Reade and Queens rooftops. Good morning you beautiful wild raptor. Seeing me off to work, are you? 🙂

25 minutes later, Penn Station, morning rush hour. A woman begins to struggle getting her stroller with a toddler up the stairs to the C subway platform. I bend down and pick up the front. Together she and I make easy work carrying the stroller for the ascent. “Gracias”, she says to me. “Muchas gracias”.

Downtown, 15 minutes before drawing session starts. At the overpriced hipster coffee shop, a pleasant exchange with the barista about the deliciousness of almond milk. He tells me to “have a great day!”.

At Minerva’s studio, I’m introduced to a man from Naples. A math professor who enjoys drawing in his spare time. He pronounces my name “CLOU – dia”.

Morning session, long pose. Afternoon session, gestures and short poses. I’m the model for both. Bang my shin. Can’t find my favorite hair clip. Feeling flexible. And creative. Finished at 4:00. Man who had been drawing comes over to me, presses a $10 bill into my palm. “Oh gosh, thank you so much!” I say. “No, thank YOU” he replies. “Great poses”. A rare modeling tip.

C train back uptown. Muscly hardhat guy gives up his seat for an elderly lady. My Blackberry beeps out a text message; a modeling gig inquiry for January. Group of tourists consulting a NYC subway map.

Penn Station again. Rush hour again. Homeless trumpeter is playing a plaintive “Silent Night”. His horn reverberates throughout the Eight Avenue concourse. I drop some singles in his instrument case. He nods at me without moving the trumpet mouthpiece from his lips.

Back on the railroad, track 21, the 4:46 back to Queens. Seat at the window. Man, mid-thirties, dark complexion, sits next to me. Takes out a leather bound Bible. Reads Corinthians for the entire ride. I put in my iPod earbuds. Scroll for music. Schubert’s piano Impromptus. Sit back. Finish my box of raisins.

Home in Queens. Jessie the cat rubs lovingly against my legs. Purring … “rrrrrr”. The ball of fur missed me. Can of salmon for her. Glass of wine for me. Day of blessings. Day of grace. Day of reminders, reinforcements, interactions, and taking nothing for granted.

From that day, my one minute gesture poses sketched by Bob Palevitz … in detail:

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Sustaining Days

Modeling by me. Sketches, notes, and anatomy lesson by Minerva Durham. Wednesday afternoon, 293 Broome St, New York City:

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So what have you all been doing the past few days? 😉 Hopefully being sustained, as I have, by doing what rewards you, challenges you, nourishes you, and galvanizes you through the tedium. I am grateful for my livelihood an an artist’s model, and privileged to work with inspiring individuals like Minerva, the best life drawing instructor in New York City.

It’s a busy time of year. So when I’m not blogging, you know what I’m doing! Early wishes for a happy Thanksgiving to all. See you back here very soon … peace, friends.