Flying Colors

A funny bit of synchronicity happened the other night when I was modeling at the National Art League in Queens. For an eight session booking with instructor Rob Silverman, I am set up wearing a skirt, hat, and shawl, sitting on a lawn chair, reading a book. The clothing is mine, which I brought to the first session at Rob’s request, but the book was a last minute addition. I didn’t have one with me, so we took one from the League bookshelf. We models are sometimes asked to do the “posing while reading” routine, as it makes for a nice composition, showing the subject more “active” than just sitting in a chair and staring into space. And with our set-up, the student artists can paint in an “outdoor” nature setting for the background and experiment with that, if they so choose.

So the book I’m reading is an old publication from the 1950s called Color for Profit by Louis Cheskin, who I’ve learned was the marketing brain behind “The Marlboro Man” ad campaign. Though the title is less than inspiring, the book is actually quite interesting! It’s a manual that discusses the effective use of color in advertising, packaging, and commercial design, in addition to exploring the science of colors and their various psychological effects. Out of curiosity, I looked the book up on Amazon and lo and behold, there it was. Although my pose-reading during the class is a bit hampered by my not be able to wear my reading glasses, I have been able to decipher some interesting lines through my blurred vision. For example, yellow is not a “preferred” color for many people, but it has strong “retention”. “Peach”, on the other hand, is a well-liked color but is also more easily forgotten. Also, there are regional preferences in colors among consumers. What goes over well on California billboards and store shelves may not go over well in New Jersey’s.

Moving along, Rob was doing was one of his very informative demos for the class. He’s really a superb teacher and I’ve posed for him many times. He took this photo of me in a pose from a class last year. So I was in the pose for the demo, and when a student asked a question about background colors, Rob’s response was, in substance, the exact same thing I was reading at that very moment in the Color for Profit book – page 95:  “Because warm colors advance and cool colors recede, overly warm colors should be avoided on backgrounds”. What a coincidence! I was listening to the discussion while posing, eyes downcast, and a smile crept across my face. If I wasn’t such a consummate professional (hehe) I would have jumped out of my chair, held up the book and said “Haha, I just read that!”. Now even though the book is dealing with packaging and merchandising, the qualities of colors remain the same no matter what – in fine arts, in commercial arts, makes no difference.

Here is Rob’s demo work of me in my “sitting and reading” pose. And there’s the book!

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And this color study is by Paul David Elsen, class monitor and a wonderful artist who has been an absolute pleasure to work with. I love these kinds of loose paint sketches.

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Art Model Funnies

Helloooo everyone! Hope you’re all well. I’ve been plowing through an unusually busy December of art modeling. I’m grateful for the work, of course, but definitely looking forward to the start of Christmas week, when I’ll be blissfully off until after new year’s. My body will appreciate the rest and recharge, and maybe the crick in my lower back will go away once and for all.

It’s been a while since I posted some funnies for you, so I have a few tonight. Enjoy these cartoons, and I’ll be back very soon. Have a great weekend! :-)

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Ahoy Buccaneer

“Are you a real pirate??!!”. That was the adorable question posed to me by one of the kids in Martha Bloom’s Art and Drama class for children ages 5 – 9 at the National Academy. The little girl’s inquiry was perfectly reasonable since I had already changed into my pirate costume :-) Children’s art classes certainly don’t make up the bulk of an art model’s booking schedule, but on the occasions when we do pose for the little ones it’s a welcome departure from the adult classes. No offense grown-ups, but kids are more fun!

Martha Bloom has been fostering the imaginations and creative spirits of New York City’s children for over three decades. Her classes are the starting points for the superb young artists’ education offered at the National Academy. With the help of goodies from the prop closet, Martha set up a makeshift mast for my pirate boat and put a treasure chest at my feet, with a rubber rat crawling out. “Blimey! Thar be a rat in me booty chest! Walk the plank ye little scalawag!!”

As the late afternoon sun streamed into the National Academy’s elegant Stone Room, the children set up their markers, crayons, and papers. Martha took this photo of me during the pose.“Ayyee aye matey! I am a pirate wench!! Give me a bottle o grog and we be swashbucklin’ three sheets to the wind!”

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This is Sasha’s drawing:

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And this is Eliza’s drawing:

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The class Halloween show was just around the corner, and Gemma was assigned the task of designing the invitation. She created this excellent illustration:

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We went down to the office and made copies, which came out great. And a poster to go along with them.

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At the end of class, when I emerged from behind the changing screen dressed in my street clothes, Gemma exclaimed “You’re NOT a real pirate!!”. I think it was my NY Mets shirt that gave me away :lol:

But Ratty the rubber rat managed to get over to the window of the Stone Room. Unless someone carried him over there … a pirate wench perhaps? Hmm …
The last time I saw him he was taking in the view of East 89th Street, gazing at the Guggenheim:

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A Wing and a Prayer

As a professional art model in New York City one of my biggest fears has always been that some misfortune would befall Spring Studio, our town’s singular life drawing studio for artists of all skill levels and my absolute favorite venue in which to pose. Sadly, that day has come. Minerva Durham, Spring Studio’s founder and director, is being ousted from her space at 64 Spring Street. Why? You can probably guess why, using the words “landlord”, “market value”, “rent”, and “real estate”, not to mention the very nature of this city, its strenuous commitment to shift and transform, and its myriad David vs Goliath battles among businesses and residents with divergent interests. Here is the NY Times article about the Spring Studio situation: “SoHo Artist’s Studio, a Space Detached From Time, Is Forced to Move”. Now I don’t want to jinx anything and write about a possible new space for the studio. But if anyone has the resilience and the determination to keep their passion alive, it’s Minerva. So we’ll just leave it at that. In the meantime I, and everyone else who cherishes Spring Studio, will be keeping our fingers crossed.

On a less depressing note, my New York Mets are 1/3 of the way into a rollicking postseason run, and we diehard fans are loving every minute of it! Except for the stressful, feel-like-you’re-gonna-have-a-heart-attack parts, but hey that’s the price you pay for being in the playoffs :-) But I take nothing for granted. All the teams are formidable and they all want to win. It’s all magic and mayhem, fastballs and breaking balls, diving catches and stolen bases and utterly deranged fans!

So as of now I’m praying for my very dear friend and mentor Minerva Durham, and my beloved NY Mets. May they both survive and prevail and continue to bring joy to those who love them.

Prayer, by Kazimir Malevich. Tempera on wood, 1907:

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Art Around Town

Well hello there friends! It wasn’t my intention to go so long without a new blog post. I’ve just been completing a long sculpture pose at Grand Central Atelier and then jumped right into a weekend workshop with Max Ginsburg. So it’s been modeling duties, and the resulting body rest, that have occupied me for the past several days. I was worried that pilates class on Monday would be agonizing, but it wasn’t! Felt really good actually. My spine was grateful :-)

My good friend Francisco Malonzo shared something with me that I’d like to share with all of you. It reminded me that artists and models can appreciate the same experience of seeing artwork on the wall – artists delight at seeing their creation on display, and we models delight at seeing ourselves on display. A collector here in NYC took pictures of Francisco’s pieces in his Upper West Side apartment and they’re wonderful to see. A portrait of me is among the collection. You can view them on Francisco’s blog. Francisco’s dazzling work has appeared on Museworthy several times over the years. You can view previous posts here and here .

Also, I thought I’d share a photo from the sculpture class at Grand Central Atelier. It was a terrific gig with a lovely small class. I did a standing pose, which is fairly common for sculpture, and it was well worth it as you can see in this impressive work by fourth year student Charlie Mostow:

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Lastly, in keeping with three-dimensional creations, a photo I took last night at a gathering at the Armenian Diocese here in New York, where a new sculpture was unveiled to commemorate the centennial of the Armenian Genocide. Michael Aram designed this stainless steel work called “Migrations”, and on a beautiful moonlit October evening in the city, clergy members, artists, and Armenian New Yorkers were deeply moved by the dedication of this piece. My phone pic is okay but you can see it more clearly at Architectural Digest with an accompanying article.

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That’s all for now, friends. I’ll see you soon!

Happy 8th Birthday Museworthy!!

An artist’s model with poise and stamina can work steadily throughout the year. An artist’s model with a thirst for writing, conversation, and self-expression can also blog steadily, for several years. Today on Museworthy, we commemorate eight years of the good stuff – 815 posts, 7,534 comments, 760 subscribers, 1,485,773 hits. Abundant and sincere thanks to all of you who read regularly, or intermittently, and enjoy your visits to my little corner of the Internet.

Our annual tradition continues, of course, with a photo of yours truly taken by my dear friend, the one and only Fred Hatt – the only person on earth who photographs me in my birthday suit. But there’s something different about this year’s photo. In the previous ones – all seven of them – I was never looking at the camera. Now, after a decade as a professional art model and being stared at by hundreds of pairs of eyes, the model turns the tables … and stares back. Here’s lookin’ at you, kids ;-)

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Do I have superhero powers of sticking to the ceiling? Or did Fred set up on a ladder above me to take this shot? Hmm. Quite the enigma! Well, click on the photo (it’s a nice large file) and rotate it around. One of those angles is the original.

Museworthy friends, I’ve said it so many times and will continue to say it because it’s the truth. This blog is sustained by you; through your comments, “likes”, Tweets, Facebook shares, feedback, and personal emails, and also by my conscious perception that you’re out there – reading, clicking, subscribing. I had no idea how this blog would evolve when I first started it. In retrospect, I’m immensely grateful that I gave it a go and allowed it to take me, and my beloved readers, on a joyous ride through art, music, and musings. Let’s do it for another year, shall we? And I must include a shoutout to WordPress for providing an excellent blogging platform since day one.

For our blog birthday song, I feel an uncontrollable need to hear Robert Plant’s voice, so here’s some Led Zeppelin. Listen with me, friends. Blessings, love, and light .. to each and every one of you. And from the bottom of my heart, thank you for your readership :-)

Your muse, Claudia
xoxo

 

Summer and Downtown Drawing

Helloooo friends! Looks like I’ve done it again by letting the blog lapse for too long. Well at least I left you with beautiful dragonflies :-) Since that post I’ve turned one year older. My birthday was on July 22nd and it came and went without much fanfare, which is fine. My sweet cat Jessie is suffering with asthma, poor thing. So I’ve been tending to her and giving her bronchodilators. This stiflingly hot and humid weather isn’t helping matters. Art modeling was slow in July but the jobs I did have were quite enjoyable; summer art programs for young people, a few private group sessions, and good old Spring Studio which never goes on hiatus. Now I enter the perennial art modeling dead zone that is August. As of now I believe I have a grand total of six gigs booked for the entire month, most of which are at .. Spring Studio. It’s long been my favorite venue in which to pose. Love that place.

So here’s a quickie of me created at the inimitable, one-of-a-kind underground life drawing space that is Spring Studio in the SoHo section of Manhattan. A sketch in pencil and wash by my friend Jordan Mejias. I liked this a lot when I saw it in his art pad, and Jordan was his usual “Eh, it’s okay” self. That’s Jordan. That’s many artists in fact. But over the years I’ve learned that we models often appreciate qualities in drawings that artists sometimes miss. Not always, just sometimes. Remember, WE were holding the pose. We felt it, we breathed into it, we became it in muscle and flesh and bone. So when we glance upon its capture that looks like it felt, we get it. So artists, if the model is taken with your drawing, consider it a compliment, truly. Here, Jordan got down the essential basics in five minutes. Lines and shapes, then a splash of color. Abstract, simple, and totally me … bending forward while sitting cross-legged. This is art modeling. It’s what we do :-)

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