Amrita Sher-Gil

She has been called “the Indian Frida Kahlo”. To a fellow 20th century female painter with the same fearless and rebellious spirit as the Mexican icon, the moniker is no doubt a great compliment. Though her life and career were brief, Amrita Sher-Gil defied conventional norms and left a legacy as India’s most celebrated woman artist of the modern era.

AmritaSherGil

She came into the world blessed with privileged circumstances, and was reared with an Indo-European cultural identity that would shape her sensibilities as she matured. Amrita Sher-Gil was born in Budapest in 1913 to highly accomplished and well-connected parents. Her father was a Sikh aristocrat and scholar, and her mother was a Hungarian opera singer. Both of them encouraged and supported their daughter’s art education and training. The family moved to Shimla in northern India when Amrita was a child and she began creating her first artworks at the age of five. By the time she was in her teens Amrita, accompanied by her mother, was studying sculpture in Italy and, later, painting in France at the esteemed Ecole des Beaux Arts.

With the requisite formal academic training under her belt, Amrita was ready to discover her authentic voice. I find it fascinating how a young woman in the 1920s and 30s, whose experiences overlapped between the European west, British Raj, and traditional India, manages to find a sense of cultural belonging. Amrita’s fiercely independent spirit and fervent curiosity surely helped her navigate the unique cultural patchwork in which she found herself. In photos of Amrita taken during various stages of her life, she appears in some of them wearing traditional Indian dress, and in others wearing bathing suits and fashionable western clothing.

During her years in Paris, Amrita drew profound inspiration from the works of Cezanne, and post-Impressionists like Gauguin and van Gogh. Gauguin, with his subjects of native people and village life, and use of bold lines and rich palettes, became a particularly strong influence and is evident in many of Sher-Gil’s paintings.

Hungarian Gypsy Girl, 1932:

Amrita_Sher-Gil_Hungarian-gypsy-girl

One of Amrita’s most well-known works, this is Three Girls, 1935. It was her first painting upon returning to India from Europe. She wrote, “I realized my real artistic mission, to interpret the life of Indians and particularly the poor Indians pictorially; to paint those silent images of infinite submission and patience,… to reproduce on canvas the impression those sad eyes created on me.”

Sher-Gil-ThreeGirls

Painting of Sumair, Amrita’s cousin, 1936:

Shergil-Sumair

A lovely photo of a smiling Amrita with three of her paintings:

Amrita_Sher-Gil_with_3_paintings

In 1938, against her parents’ wishes, Amrita married her first cousin on the Hungarian side of her family, Victor Egan, and returned to India for good. Amrita realized that she was destined to paint in India and India alone, never having felt completely comfortable, artistically, in Europe. As she put it, “There [Europe] I was not natural and honest because I was born with a certain thirst for colour and in Europe the colours are pale – everything is pale.” The couple first settled in Uttar Pradesh, where Amrita immersed herself in painting themes of rural Indian life and the struggling poor, particularly the women and children, whom she portrayed with solemn empathy.

Hill Women:

Shergil-HillWomen

Part of Sher-Gil’s “South Indian Trilogy”, this is Bride’s Toilet, 1937:

Amrita_Sger-Gil_Bride's_Toilet

In 1941, Amrita and Victor moved to Lahore (present day Pakistan). Then, tragically, Amrita fell ill and slipped into a coma in December of that year. The cause of death is not known, although it’s been speculated to have been possibly food poisoning, peritonitis, or a botched abortion. She was only 28 years old. A woman of liberated modern mind who chose to remain artistically faithful to her indigenous roots. Frida Kahlo approves.

9 thoughts on “Amrita Sher-Gil

  1. Yet another interesting blog entry, never heard of her, thanks!

  2. Bill says:

    Same here. I’ve known a number of people who’ve been raised in multi-cultural, economically and socially privileged environments who have a more global perspective than most people — almost a wider sense of the possible. She probably needed this attitude to overcome some of the barriers she probably encountered.
    It’s cool to see someone who’s combined those advantages with natural talent and the hard work necessary to create these painting

    • artmodel says:

      Bill,

      Yes, I was most interested in her cultural perspective, and that she ultimately chose to portray Indian life in her art. Tragic that she died so terribly young.

      Thanks for your comments!

      Claudia

  3. Jennifer says:

    This was a really interesting piece and I love her paintings. Thanks for bringing her to us.

  4. Jim O'Neil says:

    After reading this I did a google search for Amrita Sher-Gil images and the Hungarian Gypsy Girl image links back to Museworthy!

  5. Rosalina says:

    wonderful story, thank you for introducing me to her work, the blog is lovely as well.

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