Matisse in Town

Hey, hey, hey … what’s going on here?? Is this blog awake?? Has the muse been MIA? She has! Bad blogger! Sorry for the stagnancy, dear readers. The only excuses I have are a brief Internet outage last week, followed by home heating issues that were only temporarily resolved. Still have problems there, and it keeps getting colder! Hopefully it will be fixed before I freeze my heinie off :lol:

The first item on the agenda is a bittersweet one. After 5 1/2 years my good friend Fred Hatt has decided to discontinue his superb art and photography blog Drawing Life. He explains his reasons – good ones – in his final post. As much as Fred’s blogging will be missed, his new gainful employment at the Museum of Modern Art is a positive development, and I wish him all the best in the shifting patterns of his life and fresh directions. Good luck Fred!

And MoMA also brings us to the next item which is the highly-anticipated Matisse Cut-Outs exhibition that has now opened and will be on view until February 8th. The excitement surrounding this show has been intense and it’s the most talked about subject lately at all my art modeling jobs. The New York Times review calls it “a Victory Lap”. And the New York Observer calls it “Vibrant, Shocking, Life-Affirming”. Some of Museworthy’s British readers may have seen this spectacular show at the Tate over the summer, where it was a huge smash. Matisse draws crowds, that’s for sure. And it’s understandable. Color, imagination, experimentation … Matisse tested his creative vision to his last day. I won’t miss this show!

Here is Matisse with his cat :-)

MatisseCat

Body Language

Greetings friends! I’m not going to bombard you all with another dissertation today. Instead, just a simple offering of some good old art modeling and a reminder that I have been officially back at work for the past few weeks. The muse has returned to the platforms of New York City! Get those pencils sharpened :-)

The sketches of Bob Palevitz have been longtime favorites here on Museworthy, so who better to contribute the first drawing creations of the new season? From my modeling session at Spring Studio last week, a page of quick gesture poses and a longer sitting pose. Bob has a real gift for capturing the model’s movements and posture:

IMG_6836

IMG_6842

We begin a three-day weekend for the Columbus Day holiday. Have a great one everybody! See you very soon :-)

Elaine Hajian, Artist

It is with great daughterly pride that I announce my mother’s solo art exhibition at the Queens Botanical Garden. Yay Mommy!! This event has been almost a year in the making, and what a joyous triumph it is. Mom’s show, titled “Evolution of an Artist”, has just been unveiled in the Visitor’s Building and will remain on view until January 17th. Also, Mom is teaching a Plein Air Art Workshop this Saturday at the Botanical Garden. So basically, Mama is on a roll! I can’t tell you all how proud I am of her, happy for her, and how much my brother and I are sharing in her palpable exuberance during this time of artistic renewal in her life. The reception will take place on Sunday, October 26th, which also happens to be Mom’s 79th birthday. How cool is that? :-)

Mom assembled a collection of her paintings that combine older pieces with new works, in oils and pastels, the latter being her favorite medium. Thanks to the invaluable assistance of her dear friends Joyce and Ed Morrill, the show came together magnificently, and the wonderful staff at the Botanical Garden are absolutely delighted to have mom’s paintings on display in their center. I took some photos on Wednesday.

IMG_6784

IMG_6792

The reflecting pool outside the building can be seen through the floor-level windows:

IMG_6770

While most of the pieces are landscapes and cityscapes, this section was curated nicely to group together sentimental subjects: portrait of my great-grandfather, an Armenian farm girl, a knitting grandma, and my cat Monty in a special work Mom gave me as a present after he died. It’s “Not for Sale”, but rather “on loan” from the walls of my house:

IMG_6796

So you can fully grasp the beautiful setting of the show amid the Queens Botanical Garden, this is the view from the exhibition space. Much nicer than those windowless galleries on the west side if you ask me:

IMG_6797

The lovely Rose Garden on the grounds that would inspire any artist, still looking healthy and vigorous in early October:

IMG_6818

IMG_6821

Congratulations Mom! You are so vital, so tireless, so youthful and enthusiastic in your outlook on life. I admire you, truly, with all my heart :-)

And Museworthy readers, Music Monday returns next week! So stop by in a few days and we’ll have lots of fun. See you soon!

Happy 7th Birthday Museworthy!!

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your … eyes …
I come not to bury anyone, but to praise … my readers …

Here we are again, my darlings. Another mini milestone on the blogging odyssey. Forgive me for the grandiose word but I do see it as an “odyssey” of sorts. Maybe it doesn’t rise to the level of epic Greek poetry, but in my heart and soul this blog is a place of discovery and warmth, discourse and revelation. What do we do here at Museworthy? We laugh, we wonder, we question and often challenge, we relish beauty, poetry and music, we examine and study, share, reminisce, and admire. I “know” all of you. Some better than others of course. But even those of you whose email addresses have held steady in my subscribers list for years, choose to lurk quietly, and read my new posts as they pop into your mailboxes, yes you too. I see you, and appreciate you. And to everyone, keep sticking with me I’ll keep sticking with you. We have much more to explore. And it will be a blast, that’s a promise ;-)

The annual Museworthy “blogaversary” wouldn’t mean a damn without the tradition of a Fred Hatt photo of yours truly. We’ve done it since year one. We hit it this year with a variation of a standing contrapposto, which the artists among you know is a timeless art modeling classic. Thank you, Fred. You rock, my dear friend …

fredhatt-claudia2014-D7K_2513RR

Our music for this year’s party is the Southern rock stylings of Little Feat. This is “Two Trains” from their 1973 album Dixie Chicken, so get your feet tappin’ and spirits groovin’. As for year eight of Museworthy? I’m ready if you guys are. Let’s do it! Hugs and smooches to you all, and a most sincere and grateful THANK YOU for your readership. It absolutely means the world. Bless you all for your generosity …

Love, your muse, Claudia xoxo

 

Eye on Scotland

Hellooooooo friends!!! Hope this blog post finds you well. If anyone is wondering that I’ve forgotten about Music Mondays, I assure you that I haven’t! They will return shortly. I’ve just been getting back into the art modeling groove, booking jobs, and trying to make sure that my schedule is in order. I’ll be working for the first time later this month at the 92ndStY and some other new gigs, along with the old staples like the National Academy, FIT, and Spring Studio.

Tomorrow is the big referendum in Scotland in which the good people of that beautiful country will vote “Yes” or “No” for independence from the United Kingdom. I’ve been following the story mostly on Twitter where it has dominated the trending topics list for weeks, packed with photos, live tweets of rallies, opinion pieces, analysis, and hashtags galore. Alex Salmond, leader of the Scottish National Party, has been leading the charge and proponents of both sides of the issue have been passionately outspoken. Like, really outspoken! This is truly historic stuff and with reports of extremely close poll numbers, it’s impossible to predict the outcome.

Since this blog receives many visitors from the UK, I thought I’d do my humble part and offer a bit of painting to mark this hugely consequential event. This is To Pastures New by Scottish artist James Guthrie, from 1882. I suspect the geese are voting “Yes”, but I’m not sure. Just a hunch ;)

Guthrie-PasturesNew

My Town

I hadn’t intended to post for the September 11th anniversary, as it’s not something I do every year. I posted back in 2011 for the ten year remembrance but not since then. I think with the current global events and resurgence of terrorism threats, feelings of fear, anger, and unease have been triggered in many people – especially those of us who live and work in big densely populated cities.

There’s no question that the 911 attacks and their aftermath are deeply felt by all Americans. But it will always be different for New Yorkers; more acute, more personal, more harrowing. Unless you lived here at the time you can’t fully understand. I don’t mean in any way to diminish others’ feelings or ignore Shanksville and the Pentagon. I’d never do that. I’m just trying to express the unique and exceptional mindset of a unique and exceptional city that remains a bullseye for grievance-obsessed monsters. It is a city that will never stop inspiring people, a city that wallops its inhabitants with challenges and impossibilities, thrills and disenchantments, oddities and curiosities, scandals and triumphs, idealism and cynicism. We are a maddeningly paradoxical town, where neurosis and fortitude live side by side. We rebuild on top of rubble, and we hold up a collective middle finger to people who think they can destroy us. And to those who hate New York or don’t understand it, we respond in snippy Big Apple form: take it or leave it.

New York, by Franz Kline, 1953

Kine-NewYork

Love, peace, and blessings to all of you, on this day and every day …

Poetry in the Peat

Digging by Seamus Heaney -

Between my finger and my thumb
The squat pen rests; snug as a gun.

Under my window, a clean rasping sound
When the spade sinks into gravelly ground:
My father, digging. I look down

Till his straining rump among the flowerbeds
Bends low, comes up twenty years away
Stooping in rhythm through potato drills
Where he was digging.

Farmers Planting Potatoes, Vincent van Gogh:

VanGogh-FarmersPlantingPotatoes

The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft
Against the inside knee was levered firmly.
He rooted out tall tops, buried the bright edge deep
To scatter new potatoes that we picked,
Loving their cool hardness in our hands.

By God, the old man could handle a spade.
Just like his old man.

Farmer with a Pitchfork, Winslow Homer:

Homer-FarmerwithPitchfork

My grandfather cut more turf in a day
Than any other man on Toner’s bog.
Once I carried him milk in a bottle
Corked sloppily with paper. He straightened up
To drink it, then fell to right away
Nicking and slicing neatly, heaving sods
Over his shoulder, going down and down
For the good turf. Digging.

A Man Digging Potatoes, Thomas Frederick Mason Sheard:

(c) Oxford City Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap
Of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge
Through living roots awaken in my head.
But I’ve no spade to follow men like them.

Between my finger and my thumb
The squat pen rests.
I’ll dig with it.